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Posts Tagged ‘foreign policy’

lens2054263_1229291097democrat-vs-republicanWho is telling the truth? Who is to blame for all of this financial corruption and insanity? Was it Bush?. Is it a Democratic Congress that spends itself right into a corner. Should I listen to the words that fall from Rush Limbaugh lips as if it were  music or should I slam my foot into my car radio. Everything seems so slanted I feel like I’m walking at a 45 degree angle.dem_vs_gop-lg

I’d like to know you feel. Comment as you wish. Newsvine has a great poll.

Here’s the link http://joulesbeef.newsvine.com/_news/2009/03/18/2562687-is-the-gop-the-party-of-bold-face-liars

The title asks if the GOP is a party of boldface liars. But it’s starting to look  like there is plenty of blame to go around on both sides.

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From Susan Eisenhower’s Blog and definitely worth the read!

For more than fifteen years, I have regularly appeared in the media as a foreign policy expert.  I’ve always tried to be accessible to everyone from all ends of the political spectrum.  Citizen dialogue and education, I believe, are the cornerstones of a vibrant democracy.  Over the years, I have been interviewed by outlets of every ideological stripe, but recent experience tells me how far our public discourse has deteriorated.

In February of this year I announced my support for Barack Obama.  As a lifelong Republican I decided to support this Democratic contender because he has, I believe, the energy, the intellectual capability, as well as the temperament and the steadiness to lead this country during this perilous time.  Since then, I’ve appeared on many television and radio programs hosted by people who do not like Senator Obama.  Compared to my experiences over the years, these interlocutors have been aggressive and the subtexts of their questions have inappropriately implied that anyone who supports the Illinois Senator is either unpatriotic, uninformed, or simply a fool.

On top of this the McCain campaign has engaged in incendiary “Robo” calls and misleading brochures, which promote baseless personal smears.  John McCain says Obama is a socialist, and Senator Mel Martinez (R-FL) actually suggested that Obama is a “Communist.”  This is nonsense.  Obama is advancing a tax policy that was first adopted by Republican President Teddy Roosevelt, and the Obama proposals do nothing more than return us to Reagan-era tax levels.

People who share traditional Republican values have nothing to fear from Senator Obama, that’s why other distinguished Republicans like General Colin Powell, Senator Lincoln Chafee, Congressman Jim Leach, Bush Press Secretary Scott McClellan, Reagan Chief of Staff Ken Duberstein, Bush Defense Policy Board official Ken Adelman, and the iconic conservative names of Buckley and Goldwater are now associated with Obama’s campaign.

We have had many chapters in American history when fear has gotten the better of us and “guilt by association” or “guilt by race, ethnicity or gender” has prevailed.  But we must be better than that.  In today’s fractured and challenging times, spreading false rumors is not only divisive, it is downright dangerous.  We will only survive if we pull together and unite as a nation.

As we vote on Tuesday, we should pause and look at our communities and be grateful that many fine, talented people want to serve our country in this period of dislocation and crisis.  We must shrug off the fear mongers who have tried to sell us an election season of devils and demons who don’t exist.

Susan Eisenhower is a policy expert and author.  She is the granddaughter of Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower.  For more information visit: http://www.susaneisenhower.com/

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From Deepak Chopra September 5th, 2008. This article has given me a lot to ponder when it comes to the “energy” of this election. I know there will many eyebrows raised on this one.

Sometimes politics has the uncanny effect of mirroring the national psyche even when nobody intended to do that. This is perfectly illustrated by the rousing effect that Gov. Sarah Palin had on the Republican convention in Minneapolis this week. On the surface, she outdoes former Vice President Dan Quayle as an unlikely choice, given her negligent parochial expertise in the complex affairs of governing. Her state of Alaska has less than 700,000 residents, which reduces the job of governor to the scale of running one-tenth of New York City. By comparison, Rudy Giuliani is a towering international figure. Palin’s pluck has been admired, and her forthrightness, but her real appeal goes deeper.

She is the reverse of Barack Obama, in essence his shadow, deriding his idealism and exhorting people to obey their worst impulses. In psychological terms the shadow is that part of the psyche that hides out of sight, countering our aspirations, virtue, and vision with qualities we are ashamed to face: anger, fear, revenge, violence, selfishness, and suspicion of “the other.” For millions of Americans, Obama triggers those feelings, but they don’t want to express them. He is calling for us to reach for our higher selves, and frankly, that stirs up hidden reactions of an unsavory kind. (Just to be perfectly clear, I am not making a verbal play out of the fact that Sen. Obama is black. The shadow is a metaphor widely in use before his arrival on the scene.)

I recognize that psychological analysis of politics is usually not welcome by the public, but I believe such a perspective can be helpful here to understand Palin’s message. In her acceptance speech Gov. Palin sent a rousing call to those who want to celebrate their resistance to change and a higher vision.

Look at what she stands for:

–Small town values — a denial of America’s global role, a return to petty, small-minded parochialism.

–Ignorance of world affairs — a repudiation of the need to repair America’s image abroad.

–Family values — a code for walling out anybody who makes a claim for social justice. Such strangers, being outside the family, don’t need to be heeded.

–”Reform”an italicized term, since in addition to cleaning out corruption and excessive spending, one also throws out anyone who doesn’t fit your ideology.

–Rigid stands on guns and abortion — a scornful repudiation that these issues can be negotiated with those who disagree.

–Patriotism — the usual fallback in a failed war.

 

Palin reinforces the overall message of the reactionary right, which has been in play since 1980, that social justice is liberal-radical, that minorities and immigrants, being different from “us” pure American types, can be ignored, that progressivism takes too much effort and globalism is a foreign threat. The radical right marches under the banners of “I’m all right, Jack,” and “Why change? Everything’s OK as it is.” The irony, of course, is that Gov. Palin is a woman and a reactionary at the same time. She can add mom to apple pie on her resume, while blithely reversing forty years of feminist progress. The irony is superficial; there are millions of women who stand on the side of conservatism, however obviously they are voting against their own good. The Republicans have won multiple national elections by raising shadow issues based on fear, rejection, hostility to change, and narrow-mindedness.

Obama’s call for higher ideals in politics can’t be seen in a vacuum. The shadow is real; it was bound to respond. Not just conservatives possess a shadow — we all do. So what comes next is a contest between the two forces of progress and inertia. Will the shadow win again, or has its furtive appeal become exhausted? No one can predict. The best thing about Gov. Palin is that she brought this conflict to light, which makes the upcoming debate honest. It would be a shame to elect another Reagan, whose smiling persona was a stalking horse for the reactionary forces that have brought us to the demoralized state we are in. We deserve to see what we are getting, without disguise.

 

 

“This election is not about me…

It’s about you.” -Barack Obama

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From Deepak Chopra September 5th, 2008. This article has given me a lot to ponder when it comes to the “energy” of this election. I know there will many eyebrows raised on this one.

Sometimes politics has the uncanny effect of mirroring the national psyche even when nobody intended to do that. This is perfectly illustrated by the rousing effect that Gov. Sarah Palin had on the Republican convention in Minneapolis this week. On the surface, she outdoes former Vice President Dan Quayle as an unlikely choice, given her negligent parochial expertise in the complex affairs of governing. Her state of Alaska has less than 700,000 residents, which reduces the job of governor to the scale of running one-tenth of New York City. By comparison, Rudy Giuliani is a towering international figure. Palin’s pluck has been admired, and her forthrightness, but her real appeal goes deeper.

She is the reverse of Barack Obama, in essence his shadow, deriding his idealism and exhorting people to obey their worst impulses. In psychological terms the shadow is that part of the psyche that hides out of sight, countering our aspirations, virtue, and vision with qualities we are ashamed to face: anger, fear, revenge, violence, selfishness, and suspicion of “the other.” For millions of Americans, Obama triggers those feelings, but they don’t want to express them. He is calling for us to reach for our higher selves, and frankly, that stirs up hidden reactions of an unsavory kind. (Just to be perfectly clear, I am not making a verbal play out of the fact that Sen. Obama is black. The shadow is a metaphor widely in use before his arrival on the scene.)

I recognize that psychological analysis of politics is usually not welcome by the public, but I believe such a perspective can be helpful here to understand Palin’s message. In her acceptance speech Gov. Palin sent a rousing call to those who want to celebrate their resistance to change and a higher vision.

Look at what she stands for:

–Small town values — a denial of America’s global role, a return to petty, small-minded parochialism.

–Ignorance of world affairs — a repudiation of the need to repair America’s image abroad.

–Family values — a code for walling out anybody who makes a claim for social justice. Such strangers, being outside the family, don’t need to be heeded.

–”Reform”an italicized term, since in addition to cleaning out corruption and excessive spending, one also throws out anyone who doesn’t fit your ideology.

–Rigid stands on guns and abortion — a scornful repudiation that these issues can be negotiated with those who disagree.

–Patriotism — the usual fallback in a failed war.

 

Palin reinforces the overall message of the reactionary right, which has been in play since 1980, that social justice is liberal-radical, that minorities and immigrants, being different from “us” pure American types, can be ignored, that progressivism takes too much effort and globalism is a foreign threat. The radical right marches under the banners of “I’m all right, Jack,” and “Why change? Everything’s OK as it is.” The irony, of course, is that Gov. Palin is a woman and a reactionary at the same time. She can add mom to apple pie on her resume, while blithely reversing forty years of feminist progress. The irony is superficial; there are millions of women who stand on the side of conservatism, however obviously they are voting against their own good. The Republicans have won multiple national elections by raising shadow issues based on fear, rejection, hostility to change, and narrow-mindedness.

Obama’s call for higher ideals in politics can’t be seen in a vacuum. The shadow is real; it was bound to respond. Not just conservatives possess a shadow — we all do. So what comes next is a contest between the two forces of progress and inertia. Will the shadow win again, or has its furtive appeal become exhausted? No one can predict. The best thing about Gov. Palin is that she brought this conflict to light, which makes the upcoming debate honest. It would be a shame to elect another Reagan, whose smiling persona was a stalking horse for the reactionary forces that have brought us to the demoralized state we are in. We deserve to see what we are getting, without disguise.

 

 

“This election is not about me…

It’s about you.” -Barack Obama

Read Full Post »